Saturday, May 18, 2019

Aeschylus: Ebooks And Educational Links

Bust of Aeschylus from the Capitoline Museums, Rome. Wikipedia

From Wikipedia: Aeschylus (c. 525/524 – c. 456/455 BC) was an ancient Greek tragedian. His plays, alongside those of Sophocles and Euripides, are the only works of Classical Greek literature to have survived. He is often described as the father of tragedy: critics' and scholars' knowledge of the genre begins with his work, and understanding of earlier tragedies is largely based on inferences from his surviving plays. According to Aristotle, he expanded the number of characters in theater to allow conflict among them, whereas characters previously had interacted only with the chorus.

Only seven of his estimated seventy to ninety plays have survived, and there is a longstanding debate regarding his authorship of one of these plays, Prometheus Bound, which some believe his son Euphorion actually wrote. Fragments of some other plays have survived in quotes and more continue to be discovered on Egyptian papyrus, often giving us surprising insights into his work.[6] He was probably the first dramatist to present plays as a trilogy; his Oresteia is the only ancient example of the form to have survived.[7] At least one of his plays was influenced by the Persians' second invasion of Greece (480–479 BC). This work, The Persians, is the only surviving classical Greek tragedy concerned with contemporary events (very few of that kind were ever written),[8] and a useful source of information about its period. The significance of war in Ancient Greek culture was so great that Aeschylus' epitaph commemorates his participation in the Greek victory at Marathon while making no mention of his success as a playwright. Despite this, Aeschylus' work – particularly the Oresteia – is acclaimed by today's literary academics.

Read more ....

EBOOKS BY AESCHYLUS

Works by Aeschylus -- Bookyards
Works by Aeschylus -- Internet Classics Archive
The Dramas of Aeschylus -- Internet Sacred Text Archive
Poems by Aeschylus -- Poetry Archive

USEFUL EDUCATIONAL LINKS

Aeschylus -- Encyclopaedia Britannica
Aeschylus -- Columbia College
Aeschylus -- Theatre Database
Aeschylus and his Tragedies -- Theatre History
Aeschylus -- New World Encycpodia
Aeschylus -- Ancient History Encyclopedia
Aeschylus -- Encyclopedia.com
Aeschylis -- Classical Literature
Aeschylus -- Crystal Links
Aeschylus and his tragedies -- Theatre History

USEFUL QUOTES

Aeschylus Quotes -- Brainy Quote
Aeschylus -- Wikiquote
Aeschylus Quotes -- Literary Quotations
Aeschylus Quotes -- Notable Quotes

VIDEOS ON AESCHYLUS










Sunday, May 12, 2019

Homer's Iliad And The Odyssey

Idealized portrayal of Homer dating to the Hellenistic period. British Museum. Wikipedia 

From Wikipedia: Homer (Ancient Greek: Ὅμηρος [hómɛːros], Hómēros) is best known as the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey. He was believed by the ancient Greeks to have been the first and greatest of the epic poets. Author of the first known literature of Europe, he is central to the Western canon.

EBOOKS BY HOMER 

Works By Homer -- Bookyards The Iliad (By Homer) -- Bookyards
Works by Homer -- Classics.mit
Books by Homer -- Project Gutenberg
The Odyssey -- Literature Network
The Illiad -- Classical.mit
The Iliad by Homer -- Full Audiobook
THE ODYSSEY by Homer - FULL AudioBook

 USEFUL EDUCATIONAL LINKS ON HOMER 

Homer -- Wikipedia
Homer: Greek poet -- Encyclopaedia Britannica
Homer Biography -- Biography
Homer Quotes -- Brainy Quote
The Odyssey at a Glance -- Cliff Notes
The Odyssey -- Classical Literature
The Odyssey Summary -- eNotes
THE ODYSSEY -- Spark Notes
Odyssey -- Wikipedia
About the Iliad -- Cliffs Notes
The Illiad -- Sparks Notes
The Illiad -- Classical Literature
Illiad -- Wikipdia

 VIDEOS ON HOMER AND HIS WORKS 

Classics Summarized: The Odyssey
Video SparkNotes: Homer's The Odyssey summary
Homer: The Iliad
Classics Summarized: The Iliad

The Legend of Gilgamesh

This is a newly discovered partially broken tablet V of the Epic of Gilgamesh. The tablet dates back to the old Babylonian period, 2003-1595 BCE. From Mesopotamia, Iraq. The Sulaymaniyah Museum, Iraq. Wikipedia 

From Wikipedia: The Epic of Gilgamesh is an epic poem from ancient Mesopotamia. Dating from the Third Dynasty of Ur (circa 2100 BC), it is often regarded as the earliest surviving great work of literature. The literary history of Gilgamesh begins with five Sumerian poems about 'Bilgamesh' (Sumerian for 'Gilgamesh'), king of Uruk. These independent stories were later used as source material for a combined epic. The first surviving version of this combined epic, known as the "Old Babylonian" version, dates to the 18th century BC and is titled after its incipit, Shūtur eli sharrī ("Surpassing All Other Kings"). Only a few tablets of it have survived. The later "Standard" version dates from the 13th to the 10th centuries BC and bears the incipit Sha naqba īmuru ("He who Saw the Deep", in modern terms: "He who Sees the Unknown"). Approximately two thirds of this longer, twelve-tablet version have been recovered. Some of the best copies were discovered in the library ruins of the 7th-century BC Assyrian king Ashurbanipal.

 THE LEGEND OF GILGAMESH (EBOOK) 

The Epic of Gilgamesh -- Academia
The Epic of Gilgamesh (Translated by N.K. Sandars) -- HDHS
The Epic Of Gilgamesh (A New Translation) -- Penguin

 USEFUL EDUCATIONAL LINKS 

The Legend of Gilgamesh -- Classical Literature
The Epic of Gilgamesh (Plot Overview) -- The Spark Notes
The Epic of Gilgamesh -- The Spark Notes
The Epic of Gilgamesh Summary -- Enotes
The Babylonian Story of the Deluge and the Epic of Gilgamish -- E.A. Wallis Budge, Sacred Texts The Gilgamesh Epic -- Cummings Study Guide
Gilgamesh -- Ancient History Encyclopedia Gilgamesh -- Wikipedia
Epic of Gilgamesh -- Wikipedia

 VIDEOS ON THE EPIC OF GILGAMESH 

The Epic of Gilgamesh Lecture -- WatchKnowLearn

Friday, February 08, 2019

Book Review: 'From Gutenberg To Google'



CSM: 'From Gutenberg to Google,' how human inquiry became a networked activity

Author Tom Wheeler chronicles how knowledge in the Western world was largely localized, artisanal, and intensely exclusionary until Johannes Gutenberg combined a suite of technological innovations to revolutionize the way books were made.

When Johannes Gutenberg was born in the German city of Mainz around the turn of the 15th century, knowledge in the Western world was largely localized, artisanal, and intensely exclusionary. Books were expensive luxuries, the products of time-consuming specialized labor; each one was unique in both its beauty and its errors. And because of their relative scarcity, books were also considerably controllable: locking them in libraries and chaining them to lecterns turned their contents into private property.

Read more ....

Bookyards editor: We have definitely gone a long way from a few books 500 years ago .... to today where everything is networked and easily accessible.

Thursday, February 07, 2019

20 Romantic Quotes From Literature For Valentine's Day


Parade: Need Valentine’s Day Card Inspiration? 20 Romantic Quotes from Literature

Looking for a poetic message to include in a Valentine’s Day card? These romantic quotes from literature are sure to impress your sweeetheart on Valentine’s Day, or any day of the year.

1. “I wish I knew how to quit you.” —Brokeback Mountain, Annie Proulx

2. “In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.” —Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen

3. “Who, being loved, is poor?” —A Woman of No Importance, Oscar Wilde

4. “I cannot let you burn me up, nor can I resist you. No mere human can stand in a fire and not be consumed.” —Possession, A.S. Byatt

Read more ....

Bookyards Editor: There are some good ones here.

Wednesday, February 06, 2019

Books Are Far From Dead


Time: Stop Saying Books Are Dead. They’re More Alive Than Ever

“The book is dead,” is a refrain I hear constantly. I’ll run into people on the subway, in a taxi, in an airport, or wherever I might be and when I tell them what I do, they ask me “do people even still read anymore?” This simple question implies the very work I do at the National Book Foundation may not be worthwhile—or even possible. It’s generally a casual statement, a throwaway remark, a comment repeated so often that it’s taken as fact. The book is obviously dead, or at least dying, right?

Read more ....

Bookyards editor: I concur.

Tuesday, February 05, 2019

Moscow's Libraries Are Having A Revival

Moscow's Fyodor Dostoevsky Library was renovated in 2013 and now sees some 500 visitors a day, up from just a dozen or so per day in earlier years. The library hosts language clubs, readings, lectures and concerts. Lucian Kim/NPR

NPR: Once Centers Of Soviet Propaganda, Moscow's Libraries Are Having A 'Loud' Revival

The Chistye Prudy neighborhood is one of Moscow's liveliest, with restaurants and cafes clustered along a boulevard with a tram line and grand old apartment buildings.

Before the bars fill up in the evenings, the neighborhood's most popular hangout is the Fyodor Dostoevsky Library, named for the 19th century Russian writer. While young people huddle over laptops as city traffic growls past the large windows in the main reading hall, a theater group is rehearsing a play in another room. A constant stream of visitors comes through the entrance, with the front door banging behind them.

"It's one of the best libraries here in Moscow just because it has changed so much," says Alsu Gorbatyuk, 40, an English teacher who popped in after a visit to a skating rink. "I suppose that right now, Moscow is one of the centers of library culture."

Read more ....

WNU Editor: It is always good to see a library flourishing.

Monday, February 04, 2019

The End Of The Bookshop?


World Crunch: Is This The Final Chapter For World's Iconic Bookshops?

From Madrid to Cork to Shanghai, some of the most revered old bookshops are closing doors as they face pressure from big chains and e-readers. But our bookworm writer found some small signs of hope.

PARIS — A week or so before Christmas, I decided to take advantage of a quick in-and-out visit to Paris to visit one of the city's most iconic expat establishments: The Shakespeare and Company bookstore in the Latin Quarter.

A stormy night had just fallen and the temps weren't too far above freezing as I trudged across the Seine, through wind and rain, to where I expected to find the famous English-language gathering spot. But when I got there, the bookshop — famous among other things for cameos in films like Before Sunset (2004) and Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris (2011) — was nowhere to be found.

That's when it occurred to me that the venerable old locale had perhaps closed down. "Noooo," I lamented. "Say it ain't so." But yes, surely I read something to that effect, I thought. Or did I? Befuddled and very cold, I ducked under an awning and, with numb fingers, fumbled around in my pocket for my phone.

Read more ....

Bookyards editor: I hope this is not the end of the small bookshop. But high rents and low profit margins is making this business model difficult to survive in Europe and in North America.

Sunday, February 03, 2019

British Library's Collection Of Obscene Writing Goes Online

Detail from illustration in Harris’s Lists of Covent-Garden Ladies, held in the British Library ‘Private Case’ collection. Photograph: British Library

The Guardian: British Library's collection of obscene writing goes online

‘Private Case’ of sexually explicit books dating back to 1658 ranges from the hijinks of Roger Pheuquewell to pioneering gay porn in the 19th century.

The sniggeringly pseudonymous Roger Pheuquewell’s contribution to a series of 18th-century erotic novels imagining the female body as land needing to be “ploughed” is among a collection of books from the British Library’s “Private Case” – a collection of obscene titles kept locked away for more than a century that are finally being shared with a wider audience.

Read more ....

Bookyards editor: Sex and books .... somethings never change.

Friday, February 01, 2019

An Infographic On The State Of Books And Reading Across The World In 2018


Ebook Friendly: The state of books and reading in 2018 (infographic)

74% of Americans read a book in 2018. Europeans spend €200 per person on books and newspapers. Reading books on mobile phones is surging in Africa.

Following the 2017 edition, the team from Global English Editing has created an epic infographic with detailed facts and stats that help learn about the state of books and reading across the world in 2018.

Every single part of this stunning visual is worth reading and sharing.

Read more ....

Bookyards editor: There is a lot of info on this infographic.

Thursday, January 31, 2019

The Evolution Of The Alphabet Over 3,800 Years



Open Culture: The Evolution of the Alphabet: A Colorful Flowchart, Covering 3,800 Years, Takes You From Ancient Egypt to Today

No matter our native language, we all have to learn a writing system. And whichever language we learn, its writing system had to come from somewhere. Take English, the language you're reading right now and one written in Latin script, which it shares with a range of other tongues: the European likes of French, Spanish, and German, of course, but now also Icelandic, Swahili, Tagalog, and a great many more besides. The video above by Matt Baker of UsefulCharts explains just where this increasingly widespread writing system came from, tracing its origins all the way back to the Proto-Sinaitic script of Egypt in 1750 BCE.

Read more ....

WNU Editor: It is amazing how the alphabet has evolved over the centuries.

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

What Do Women And Men Read (Infographic)


Ebook Friendly: Sex and reading – what do women and men read (infographic)

A new infographic from Goodreads takes a closer look at reading preferences of women vs men.

What do men and women want when it comes to books? Are they reading their own gender? And what do they think of books written by the opposite sex?

To gather data for the infographic, Goodreads team looked at a sample of 40,000 active members on the site. 20,000 of them were women , 20,000 – men.

Make sure to follow Goodreads blog, as the category-specific reading infographics will be coming in the next weeks.

Tap on the infographic to enlarge it.

Read more ....

WNU Editor:  No surprise. .... women read two times more than men.

Monday, January 28, 2019

Here Are The 10 Best Online Dictionaries


Bookyards Editor: Here are our favourite online dictionaries.




Cambridge Dictionary Online


The Cambridge Dictionary is another well-respected print dictionary with a web counterpart.

Cambridge Dictionary Online



Collins Dictionary


Online Dictionary and Thesaurus from Collins with over 1 million words: Definitions, synonyms, pronunciations, translations, origin and examples.

Collins Dictionary



Dictionary.com


I love the domain name. It offers definitions, pronunciations, word origins and world history. It also is responsible for one of the best mobile dictionary apps, hands down.

Dictionary.com



Google Dictionary


You will need Google Chrome to get the most out of Google Dictionary. But aside from that, one of the best dictionaries that are currently online.

Google Dictionary



The Free Online English Dictionary from Macmillan Education.


The Free Online English Dictionary from Macmillan Education.

The Free Online English Dictionary from Macmillan Education.



Merriam-Webster Online


One of the most respected print dictionaries also has a website for your convenience.

Merriam-Webster Online



Oxford Dictionaries


The world's most trusted English Dictionary and Thesaurus. Find definitions, meanings, and word origins as well as help with writing, spelling, and grammar.

Oxford Dictionaries



The Free Dictionary


The Free Dictionary offers you the ability to search via words, characters or text. It also has a translator that works with common languages like French, German and Greek.

The Free Dictionary



Urban Dictionary
Your source for slang.

Urban Dictionary



Wiktionary


Like Wikipieda, Wikitionary has a community of editors that try to make it as accurate as possible.

Wiktionary

Sunday, January 27, 2019

Best Places to Listen to Free Music Online



Bookyards editor: For music lovers, here is a list of the best places to listen to free music online.



Best Places to Listen to Free Music Online 




What To Like

Lets you browse for music by mood
You can listen free without creating a user account
Apps are available for lots of devices

What To Not Like

Ads are shown
Streaming time is limited

8tracks




AccuRadio

What To Like

Streams radio internet
Lets you skip songs an unlimited number of times
Every day, a different genre has commercial-free music
A user account isn't required

What To Not Like

Supported by advertisements

AccuRadio




Dash Radio

What To Like

Streams radio stations online
Multiple ways to find a new radio station to listen to
Sharing radio stations is easy
Mobile apps let you listen to the radio on the go

What To Not Like

Limited selection of genres
Some genres have just a couple radio stations

Dash Radio




Deezer

What To Like

Specific and unique genres to choose from
Apps are available for phones, tablets, computers, wearables, and more
Helps you discover new music based on your likes

What To Not Like

Shows ads
Streams at standard quality, not HD

Deezer




Google Play Music

What To Like

Lots of ways to find specific types of music
Works in several countries
You can stream your own music files
Custom playlists can be built to hold your music
Subscriptions are available for more features

What To Not Like

You have to sign in to your Google account to use it
Can't stream music on multiple devices simultaneously
Doesn't let you play specific music on-demand

Google Play Music




iHeartRadio

What To Like

Has lots of radio stations
Lets you make your own radio stations
Works without commercials
You don't need to make a user account to listen
You can pay for more features

What To Not Like

You can't play specific songs on-demand
The service contains advertisements
Only a specific number of songs can be skipped per day

iHeartRadio




IncusTunes

What To Like

Unique genres to help you find new music
Connects you to YouTube videos
Lets you seek forward and backward through songs
Unlimited skips

What To Not Like

Not as visually appealing as most streaming music sites

IncusTunes




Jango

What To Like

Streams radio stations made by other users
Lots of genres to find new radio stations
It's easy to find trending and popular radio stations
There are mobile apps
You can listen without making a user account

What To Not Like

Can't play specific songs, only premade stations
There's a limit on the number of times non-users can skip songs

Jango




Mixcloud

What To Like

Lots of ways to find a radio station
All the music is handpicked by real people
Apps let you listen from a phone or tablet
A user account isn't required (it is from the mobile app)

What To Not Like

It's supported by ads
Can't listen to specific songs on demand
You might not be able to seek backwards during a song, only forward
Songs can't be skipped

Mixcloud




MusixHub

What To Like

Streams video with the songs
You can replay the same songs over and over
Lets you skip to any part during a song

What To Not Like

Sometimes slower than other similar sites because videos are loaded, too
Connects you to premade albums, not individual songs you search for

MusixHub




Myspace

What To Like

Lets you play specific music of your choice
You can skip forward and back through any song
No user account is needed
Shows videos along with the songs

What To Not Like

Can't hide the video player

Myspace




Slacker Radio

What To Like

Streams music based on your likes
You can listen to stations made by others
The website is clean and easy to use
All the music is 100 percent free
Subscriptions let you pay for additional features

What To Not Like

Doesn't let you pick which songs to play
Has audio and visual ads
You can't skip over an unlimited number of songs

Slacker Radio




SoundCloud

What To Like

Constantly updated with new content
One of the best ways to find new artists and bands
Lets you listen to any song on demand
You can move back and forward through songs at will
Minimalist design
Also includes podcasts

What To Not Like

Doesn't include many of the same songs you hear from other music streaming services

SoundCloud




Spotify

What To Like

All the music is free
Includes modern and older music
Lets you make an unlimited number of playlists
Works on a variety of devices
More features can be had if you pay

What To Not Like

Doesn't let you stream specific songs on-demand
You must make a user account to listen to music
Limits the number of songs you can skip every hour
Some features work only if you pay
Shows ads

Spotify




StreamSquid

What To Like

Plays songs directly from YouTube, but without the videos
You have full control over playback: unlimited skips and scrubbing
Playing all songs from a search is really easy
Lots of ways to find music

What To Not Like

No iOS app
Doesn't let you import YouTube playlists

StreamSquid




TuneIn

What To Like

Includes thousands of live radio stations
Stations can be favorited for easy access later
Finding stations you like is easy
You don't have to make a user account to use the TuneIn website

What To Not Like

Doesn't let you pick which specific songs to listen to

TuneIn

Saturday, January 26, 2019

How Much Do The Big Authors Earn By Word?


Title Pro: How Much Are Big Authors Worth Per Word?

What if the world’s wealthiest authors made their money per word? In reality, big-name writers like Stephen King and Nora Roberts get the majority of their pay from movie deals, merchandise, signings, and other avenues, but what if we turned the modern author pay scale into something past authors from the Victorian era had to deal with: pay per word?

Read more ....

Bookyards editor: J.K. Rowling beats everyone hands-down. She earns$957.66 per word.

Friday, January 25, 2019

Here Are 11 Public Libraries That Have Been Invaluable To World History



Oldest.org: 11 Public Libraries Invaluable to World History

Libraries around the world have long been revered as temples of human knowledge. They’ve been a part of monasteries, royal palaces, museums, universities and even hospitals. Some boast an incredibly romantic past while others, like the Library of Alexandria, were destroyed in war or purposely purged when rulers were replaced and governments fell. Many of these libraries have survived the trials of history and are home to some of the rarest collections that document cultures through the ages.

Read more ....

WNU Editor: I would have put the Vatican Library on this list.

Thursday, January 24, 2019

Is Twitter Ruining Book Publishing?

Lionel Shriver, Spectator: Why do authors have to be ‘moral’? Because their publishing contracts tell them so

My compulsion to rub strangers up the wrong way in a political sense grows only more enticing.

Suppose you’re a writer with a self-destructive proclivity for sticking your neck out. Would you sign a book contract that would be canceled in the instance of ‘sustained, widespread public condemnation of the author’? Even cautious, congenial writers are working in an era when a bland, self-evident physiological assertion like ‘women don’t have penises’ attracts a school of frenzied piranhas. So journalists would be fools to sign a document voided if, in a magazine’s ‘sole judgment’, they were the subject of ‘public disrepute, contempt, complaints or scandals’.

Read more ....

WNU Editor: With the world wide web nothing is secret anymore. Hence the morality contracts to accommodate cultural changes.

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

The Early Harry Potter Books Are Worth a Lot Of Money

Another inscribed first-edition Harry Potter book, shown at The National Library of Scotland in Edinburgh in 2017. Neil Hanna, AFP/Getty Images

Mental Floss: Two Harry Potter Books Worth Nearly $4000 Showed Up on Antiques Roadshow

First-edition Harry Potter books are extremely valuable—even more so if their pages contain a handwritten note from JK Rowling herself. A schoolteacher who owns early copies of Harry Potter book 1 and 2 in the series had both of these factors working in her favor when she brought them to the BBC program Antiques Roadshow for appraisal. Together, the two books are worth £2,000 to £3,000 (approximately $2600 to $3900), according to expert Justin Croft, who evaluated the books in a recent episode filmed in Aberdeenshire, Scotland.

Read more ....

WNU Editor: They probably will be worth a lot more 50, 100 years from now.

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

The History Of Publishing (Infographic)

(Click on Image to Enlarge)

Ribbonfish: Infographic: A Concise History of Publishing

The publishing industry has been around in some form since man was first able to write down his thoughts. It’s had its ups and downs throughout the years, from books being banned and burned, to the introduction of new technologies revolutionising the way that books (and digital products) can be manufactured and consumed.

Read more ....

Bookyards Editor: We have definitely progressed a lot since the Gutenberg press.

Saturday, January 12, 2019

Remembering Charles Dickens’s First Visit To New York

Douglas Muzzio, City Journal: When Boz Came to Town

Remembering Charles Dickens’s first visit to New York

On February 12, 1842, after a triumphal three-week stay in Boston and gala receptions and dinners in Worcester, Springfield, and Hartford, Charles Dickens—universally known by his pseudonym, “Boz”—landed at South Street in lower Manhattan on the packet New York from New Haven. When he stepped off the boat with his wife, Catherine (Kate), Dickens was greeted by a throng of cheering admirers, whom the New York Herald described as “perfectly whirlwindish . . . a promiscuous assemblage of bipeds that covered the dock as barnacles a ship’s bottom.” The paper crowed: “At last Boz breathes the balmy atmosphere of the Queen City of the Empire State.”

Read more ....

WNU Editor: You can browse and download the works by Charles Dickens from here.

Friday, January 11, 2019

This Copy Of Fahrenheit-451 Can Only Be Read If It’s On Fire



Electric Literature: Buy a Copy of Fahrenheit-451 That Can Only Be Read If It’s on Fire

For a mere $451, you can now own a limited-edition heat-sensitive copy of Ray Bradbury’s book

Graphic design studio Super Terrain’s edition of Ray Bradbury’s sci-fi classic Fahrenheit-451 took the internet by storm, thanks to a video showing how its all-black pages become readable text when exposed to an open flame. (This will, and quite possibly should, also work with a hair dryer or something else not completely on fire.) And now, for only $451 — get it? — you can preorder one to keep on a specially-heated shelf in your home! If you have $451 to drop on an artist’s book, we figure you could have custom heated shelves.

Read more ....

Bookyards editor: At $451 per copy, that is one expensive book.